Sandra Yancey Succeeding Inspite of Everything

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According to Sandra Yancey the Founder and CEO of eWomen Network Inc, International Award Winning Entrepreneur, Philanthropist, Movie Producer and a Bestselling Author. “I didn’t realize that I was poor and that my mother was on welfare. I didn’t know  that these two very handsome men in suits that would come to the house once a month with  groceries were from the church, Saint Vincent De Paul, bringing food to the poor.”

Sandra may not have had lots of money but she had lots of love and support from her mom. Her mom inspired her to become a leader. My mom said “Sandra, go out and set yourself on fire. Everyone will come and watch you burn.” And I never really understood what that meant until later in life. We are attracted to those people that are bright, those people that have that glow, that essence, that energy, that vibration that is a quality of a great leader. People are drawn to you. You have to have followers to be a leader.

I first met Sandra at the Lisa Sassevich, Event Profit Secrets. I was so impressed with Sandra’s commitment to serving others is the eWomenNetwork Foundation, a 501(c) (3) non-profit, which supports the financial and emotional health of women and children in need I donated 100 Art From My Heart books and became a member of eWomen. I had the opportunity to interview her for The Winning Adventure.                                                                                                                                                                                                         303

How did you get started in leadership?

My family  wanted me to go to college. So I went on my own, I paid my own way; I worked and was the first one in the family to graduate with a college degree.  And then I went after my advanced degrees. I worked my way up the corporate ladder from the clerical ranks to running a department.

After 13 years of being in corporate America, I moved from the “Little ‘D’” to the “Big ‘D’” – Dayton, Ohio to Dallas, Texas. At that point in time, I started a solo consulting practice, which is when I got my first real taste of what it meant to be really successful. I was making great money but I was just miserable, I mean I was always on a plane and my children were little that’s the time in my life where I wanted to be home– that’s part of the reason why I left Corporate America.

What inspired eWomen?

I started going to networking groups, which were predominately male and I had my “Aha!” moment about the “good old boys” network – I mean this in a good way! These groups focused on best practices, leads, strategic introductions, and me being a female and in the minority felt welcome, but not quite “allowed” to play the game.

I went to a few women’s groups, but they just didn’t compare. I said, “Where are all the women that want to build million-dollar businesses?”  I thought something’s missing that what we need is a hybrid, the integration of the focus and the strategy that I witnessed with the men’s group but in a way that was more comfortable for women, that’s relational.  I wanted to create a system and structure that allowed women to be very clear about monetizing their goals.

We’ve grown from being simply a networking organization to a success system. We have the richest online portal of resources from women subject matter experts that can be accessed at any time, by anyone.

What are the qualities of a great leader?

  What really differentiates great leaders is the secret sauce, relationships. It doesn’t matter if you’ve got a really great idea, a great business model,  fancy website with all the bells and whistles today and you have a four color business card and you’ve got the perfect tool or the opportunity that can change the planet.  I mean if you aren’t good at building relationships you really do have nothing, I mean at some level I think we’re all in the relationship business no matter what product or service we sell. 

 

Do you have any secrets for people just starting out?

  Don’t fake it till you make it. I did that and I think that was part of  my early struggles and almost my demise. If someone asked how are you” oh I’m fine, yet I wasn’t sleeping and the doors were to about to close. When you do that you’re being an impostor.  When you’re being an impostor you’re not living your authentic self and I don’t think that you can really create sustainable happiness and success when you are faking it. It doesn’t mean you have to cry and tell everybody your problems but it doesn’t mean you need to tell the people that can help you most that everything is fine because then they can’t help you.

 I think that multitasking for women is the kiss of death.  We think that nobody else can do it quite like us, so we micromanage and struggle.  And that’s for everything, from your business to how you fold your towels. The truth of the matter is if your customer has a great experience does it really have to be done by you? Every towel can be folded slightly different, none of the corners match, but my guess is the customer, which is your family, would be more thrilled to know that the towels are available and they’re clean rather  than the frustration and pain you go through knocking yourself out because you feel like you’ve got to do it all.

What legacy would you like to leave?

I want my legacy to be that she talked her talk. She provided access to others to be able to experience and live their purpose, their greatness and their contribution. I want to be missed. The greatest gift for me, would be that someone would say I’m better as a result of knowing her.

What legacy would you like to leave? Would love to hear from you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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